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ADHD

ADHD (Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder) is a group of behavioural symptoms that includes hyperactivity, impulsiveness and inattentiveness. Although the exact cause of ADHD is not fully understood, it is thought that it may be triggered by a mix of genetic and environmental factors.

This short test will help you to find out whether you display the kinds of inattention or hyperactivity problems that are known to be associated with ADHD. It has been supplied by Dore (This link opens in a new window/tab).

Time required: 2 minutes

ADHD

Before beginning the test, please answer the questions below. These will be used to calculate national totals – they will not be linked to you individually.

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ADHD

Question 1 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you made careless mistakes at school or work?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 2 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you struggled to sustain attention when carrying out tasks?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 3 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you lost things necessary for tasks or activities (such as books, tools or files)?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 4 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you had difficulty organising tasks or activities?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 5 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you avoided, disliked or reluctantly engaged in tasks that required sustained mental effort?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 6 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you seemed not to be listening when spoken to directly?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 7 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have found it difficult to follow through on instructions and failed to finish a work task?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 8 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you been generally forgetful in daily activities?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 9 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Have you been easily distracted?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 10 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you fidget with your hands or feet, or move around a lot when seated?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 11 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you leave your seat in situations where remaining seated is expected (such as in a meeting)?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 12 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you feel restless or agitated a lot of the time?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 13 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you have difficulty engaging in leisure activities quietly?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 14 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you ever act as if 'driven by a motor'?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 15 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you talk excessively?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 16 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you blurt out answers before questions have been completed?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 17 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you have difficulty waiting your turn (such as in a queue)?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD

Question 18 of 18
 

For the last six months or longer... Do you often interrupt others in conversations?

How much you agree. 0 = Not at all, 3 = Very much

ADHD: Your results

Low
High
You scored %
  • Low Probability

    Your results indicate you have a low probability of having ADHD. This test splits your scores into those associated with Attention and those associated with Hyperactivity. It may be that you have a higher probability of suffering from one of these than the other. If you feel that you are suffering from a problem with your attention or with hyperactivity, talk to your GP about it.

    ADHD is most commonly diagnosed in children and here the symptoms are well known and easily spotted, such as fidgeting, lack of concentration and rule breaking. However in adults the condition is more subtle and harder to detect. For example, hyperactivity tends to decrease in adults, while inattentiveness tends to get worse. Adult ADHD most commonly manifests itself in behaviours such as lack of attention to detail, restlessness and high-risk behaviour. There is no cure for ADHD, but treatment can reduce the symptoms and make the condition more manageable on a day-to-day basis. ADHD can be treated using medication or therapy, usually a combination of both gets the best results. If you are worried about ADHD or any related symptoms, consult your GP about having a full evaluation and to discuss possible treatment options.

  • Slight Probability

    Your results indicate that you may experience a little difficulty with maintaining attention and/or being hyperactive, which suggests a slight probability of having ADHD. Your results shouldn't be overly concerning – many people find staying focused difficult at times, and restlessness/agitation can also be unrelated to ADHD. That said, if you are displaying such symptoms or feel your behaviour can sometimes be disruptive, it is worth talking about these issues with your GP, and having a full assessment done if necessary.

    ADHD is most commonly diagnosed in children and here the symptoms are well known and easily spotted, such as fidgeting, lack of concentration and rule breaking. However in adults the condition is more subtle and harder to detect. For example, hyperactivity tends to decrease in adults, while inattentiveness tends to get worse. Adult ADHD most commonly manifests itself in behaviours such as lack of attention to detail, restlessness and high-risk behaviour. There is no cure for ADHD, but treatment can reduce the symptoms and make the condition more manageable on a day-to-day basis. ADHD can be treated using medication or therapy, usually a combination of both gets the best results. If you are worried about ADHD or any related symptoms, consult your GP about having a full evaluation and to discuss possible treatment options.

  • Moderate Probability

    Your results indicate that you may experience some difficulty with maintaining attention, or with hyperactivity and impulsivity, which suggests a moderate probability of having ADHD. Paying attention is something many people take for granted but, for people with ADHD-related problems, staying focused in any given situation can be a real challenge. People with hyperactivity often feel restless or agitated and have to get up and move around in situations where it might be inappropriate. Likewise people with impulsivity issues may be unable to curb their immediate reactions or think before they act. Such people are often unfairly labelled as disruptive or badly behaved. If you are worried about any of these symptoms and feel like you may have a problem, consult your GP for further advice.

    ADHD is most commonly diagnosed in children and here the symptoms are well known and easily spotted, such as fidgeting, lack of concentration and rule breaking. However in adults the condition is more subtle and harder to detect. For example, hyperactivity tends to decrease in adults, while inattentiveness tends to get worse. Adult ADHD most commonly manifests itself in behaviours such as lack of attention to detail, restlessness and high-risk behaviour. There is no cure for ADHD, but treatment can reduce the symptoms and make the condition more manageable on a day-to-day basis. ADHD can be treated using medication or therapy, usually a combination of both gets the best results. If you are worried about ADHD or any related symptoms, consult your GP about having a full evaluation and to discuss possible treatment options.

  • High Probability

    Your results indicate that you may experience considerable difficulty with maintaining attention, as well as with hyperactivity or impulsivity. This suggests a high probability of having ADHD. Paying attention is something many people take for granted but, for people with ADHD-related problems, staying focused in any given situation can be a real challenge. People with hyperactivity often feel restless or agitated and have to get up and move around in situations where it might be inappropriate. Likewise people with impulsivity issues may be unable to curb their immediate reactions or think before they act. Such people are often unfairly labelled as disruptive or badly behaved. If you are worried about any of these symptoms and feel like you may have a problem, consult your GP for further advice.

    ADHD is most commonly diagnosed in children and here the symptoms are well known and easily spotted, such as fidgeting, lack of concentration and rule breaking. However in adults the condition is more subtle and harder to detect. For example, hyperactivity tends to decrease in adults, while inattentiveness tends to get worse. Adult ADHD most commonly manifests itself in behaviours such as lack of attention to detail, restlessness and high-risk behaviour. There is no cure for ADHD, but treatment can reduce the symptoms and make the condition more manageable on a day-to-day basis. ADHD can be treated using medication or therapy, usually a combination of both gets the best results. If you are worried about ADHD or any related symptoms, consult your GP about having a full evaluation and to discuss possible treatment options.

ADHD

71,072 people have taken the test, and so far...

49% Scored “high”
49% Scored “high”

Highest scoring occupation engineer

Lowest scoring occupation musician

Average regional scores

Light green = low score -> Darkest green = high score
This is a visual representation of scores for this test for several regions of the United Kingdom.

How many of each age group scored “high”?

Age ranges: 18-30, 31-35, 36-40, 41-45, 46-50, 56-60, 61+ 18 to 30 year olds on average scored 40% 31 to 35 year olds on average scored 35% 36 to 40 year olds on average scored 70% 41 to 45 year olds on average scored 30% 46 to 50 year olds on average scored 5% 51 to 55 year olds on average scored 10% 56 to 60 year olds on average scored 20% 61 years and over on average scored 80%
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