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Depression

Depression is a serious illness and is very different from the common experience of feeling miserable or fed up for a short period. When you are depressed, you may have feelings of extreme sadness that are severe enough to interfere with your daily life for weeks or months, rather than days. Depression affects people in many ways and can cause a wide variety of symptoms. There is no single cause, though common triggers include traumatic or stressful life events, such as bereavement, illness or redundancy.

This test asks you how often in the past 2 weeks you have been concerned with a set of problems. It was developed by Pfizer and is called the PHQ-9 depression screener. It was created by Drs. Spitzer, Williams and Kroenke. It is not a diagnosis tool – only a trained medical professional can diagnose you with depression - but it will provide you with a useful indication of your risk of suffering from depression.

Time required: 2 minutes

Depression

Before beginning the test, please answer the questions below. These will be used to calculate national totals – they will not be linked to you individually.

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Depression

Question 1 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Little interest or pleasure in doing things

Depression

Question 2 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Feeling down, depressed, or hopeless

Depression

Question 3 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Trouble falling or staying asleep, or sleeping too much

Depression

Question 4 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Feeling tired or having little energy

Depression

Question 5 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Poor appetite or overeating

Depression

Question 6 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Feeling bad about yourself-or that you are a failure or have let yourself or your family down

Depression

Question 7 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Trouble concentrating on things, such as reading the newspaper or watching television

Depression

Question 8 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Moving or speaking so slowly that other people could have noticed. Or the opposite-being so fidgety or restless that you have been moving around a lot more than usual

Depression

Question 9 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? Thoughts that you would be better off dead, or of hurting yourself in some way

Depression

Question 10 of 10
 

Over the last 2 weeks, how often have you been bothered by any of the following problems? If you selected any problems, how difficult have these problems made it for you to do your work, take care of things at home, or get along with other people?

Depression: Your results

Low
High
You scored %
  • No Risk

    Your results suggest that you are not currently showing any symptoms of depression. Remember, however, that depression can be triggered by stressful or unhappy life events. Only a trained medical professional can provide an accurate diagnosis, so if you have any concerns or in time develop any symptoms, consult your GP for further advice.

    It is still a commonly held misconception that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or failure. This is simply not true. Depression is an illness that requires medical attention. It can take some time to recognise that you have depression, as the condition may develop gradually, and some people try to deal with the symptoms without recognising them for what they are. Often it needs another person to observe this behaviour and suggest that the sufferer may need to seek help. The symptoms of depression can be complex, but the most common include chronic low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and difficulties in home/family life.

    With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Treatment usually involves a combination of drugs, talking therapies and self- help, though it can vary depending on the type of depression. It is important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

  • Minimal Symptoms

    Your results suggest that you are showing minimal symptoms of depression. This is probably nothing to worry about, but it may be worth consulting your doctor to ensure these aren't warning signs for problems further down the line. Remember, depression can be triggered by stressful or unhappy life events, so you may find yourself unexpectedly at risk in the future. Only a trained medical professional can provide an accurate diagnosis, so if you have any concerns or in time develop any symptoms, consult your GP for further advice.

    It is still a commonly held misconception that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or failure. This is simply not true. Depression is an illness that requires medical attention. It can take some time to recognise that you have depression, as the condition may develop gradually, and some people try to deal with the symptoms without recognising them for what they are. Often it needs another person to observe this behaviour and suggest that the sufferer may need to seek help. The symptoms of depression can be complex, but the most common include chronic low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and difficulties in home/family life.

    With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Treatment usually involves a combination of drugs, talking therapies and self- help, though it can vary depending on the type of depression. It is important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

  • Minor/ Mild Depression

    Your results suggest that you may be suffering from either minor depression or a mild form of major depression. This may be related to a stressful or unhappy event that has happened in your life or may be due to other factors, such as genetic predisposition, illness, or lifestyle habits (e.g. alcohol or drug intake). Depression usually responds well to treatment and your doctor will be able to advise you on the best options. Only a trained medical professional can provide an accurate diagnosis so if you have any concerns, consult your GP.

    It is still a commonly held misconception that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or failure. This is simply not true. Depression is an illness that requires medical attention. It can take some time to recognise that you have depression, as the condition may develop gradually, and some people try to deal with the symptoms without recognising them for what they are. Often it needs another person to observe this behaviour and suggest that the sufferer may need to seek help. The symptoms of depression can be complex, but the most common include chronic low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and difficulties in home/family life.

    With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Treatment usually involves a combination of drugs, talking therapies and self- help, though it can vary depending on the type of depression. It is important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

  • Moderate Depression

    Your results suggest that you may be suffering from a moderate form of major depression. This may be related to a stressful or unhappy event that has happened in your life or may be due to other factors, such as genetic predisposition, illness, or lifestyle habits (e.g. alcohol or drug intake). Depression usually responds well to treatment and your doctor will be able to advise you on the best options. Only a trained medical professional can provide an accurate diagnosis so if you have any concerns, consult your GP.

    It is still a commonly held misconception that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or failure. This is simply not true. Depression is an illness that requires medical attention. It can take some time to recognise that you have depression, as the condition may develop gradually, and some people try to deal with the symptoms without recognising them for what they are. Often it needs another person to observe this behaviour and suggest that the sufferer may need to seek help. The symptoms of depression can be complex, but the most common include chronic low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and difficulties in home/family life.

    With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Treatment usually involves a combination of drugs, talking therapies and self- help, though it can vary depending on the type of depression. It is important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

  • Severe Depression

    Your results suggest that you may be suffering from a severe form of major depression. This may be related to a stressful or unhappy event that has happened in your life or may be due to other factors such as genetic predisposition, illness, or lifestyle habits (e.g. alcohol or drug intake). Depression usually responds well to treatment and your doctor will be able to advise you on the best options. People who are depressed often feel that there is nothing that can be done to help, which can actually exacerbate the problem.

    It is still a commonly held misconception that depression is not a real illness and that it is a form of weakness or failure. This is simply not true. Depression is an illness that requires medical attention. It can take some time to recognise that you have depression, as the condition may develop gradually, and some people try to deal with the symptoms without recognising them for what they are. Often it needs another person to observe this behaviour and suggest that the sufferer may need to seek help. The symptoms of depression can be complex, but the most common include chronic low mood or sadness, feelings of hopelessness and helplessness, and difficulties in home/family life.

    With the right treatment and support, most people can make a full recovery. Treatment usually involves a combination of drugs, talking therapies and self- help, though it can vary depending on the type of depression. It is important to seek help from your GP if you think you may be depressed.

Depression

71,072 people have taken the test, and so far...

49% Scored “high”
49% Scored “high”

Highest scoring occupation engineer

Lowest scoring occupation musician

Average regional scores

Light green = low score -> Darkest green = high score
This is a visual representation of scores for this test for several regions of the United Kingdom.

How many of each age group scored “high”?

Age ranges: 18-30, 31-35, 36-40, 41-45, 46-50, 56-60, 61+ 18 to 30 year olds on average scored 40% 31 to 35 year olds on average scored 35% 36 to 40 year olds on average scored 70% 41 to 45 year olds on average scored 30% 46 to 50 year olds on average scored 5% 51 to 55 year olds on average scored 10% 56 to 60 year olds on average scored 20% 61 years and over on average scored 80%
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