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Dyslexia

People who have dyslexia or dyslexia symptoms tend to have trouble with reading, writing and spelling. It can also affect concentration, short-term memory, maths, co-ordination, communication skills and organisational skills.

This test asks you to respond to a set of questions about your reading, writing, spelling and organisation. It has been supplied by Dore (This link opens in a new window/tab).

Time required: 2 minutes

Dyslexia

Before beginning the test, please answer the questions below. These will be used to calculate national totals – they will not be linked to you individually.

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Dyslexia

Question 1 of 24
 

When reading do you: Display a poor understanding of words?

Dyslexia

Question 2 of 24
 

When reading do you: Find yourself guessing words?

Dyslexia

Question 3 of 24
 

When reading do you: Find yourself guessing content or the storyline?

Dyslexia

Question 4 of 24
 

When reading do you: Reverse words or letters?

Dyslexia

Question 5 of 24
 

When reading do you: Miss out words?

Dyslexia

Question 6 of 24
 

When reading do you: Insert words?

Dyslexia

Question 7 of 24
 

When reading do you: Track words with a finger or a guide?

Dyslexia

Question 8 of 24
 

When reading do you: Find it difficult to read out aloud?

Dyslexia

Question 9 of 24
 

When reading do you: Read very slowly?

Dyslexia

Question 10 of 24
 

When writing do you: Have difficulty structuring ideas?

Dyslexia

Question 11 of 24
 

When writing do you: Write the minimum necessary?

Dyslexia

Question 12 of 24
 

When writing do you: Have difficulty copying written material?

Dyslexia

Question 13 of 24
 

When spelling do you: Have difficulty recognising mistakes?

Dyslexia

Question 14 of 24
 

When spelling do you: Have difficulty retaining simple or short words?

Dyslexia

Question 15 of 24
 

When spelling do you: Find yourself spelling the same word in different ways?

Dyslexia

Question 16 of 24
 

When spelling do you: Often spell the word as it sounds?

Dyslexia

Question 17 of 24
 

When getting organised do you: Have a poor concept of time?

Dyslexia

Question 18 of 24
 

When getting organised do you: Have difficulty organising time?

Dyslexia

Question 19 of 24
 

When getting organised do you: Often mix up dates and times?

Dyslexia

Question 20 of 24
 

When getting organised do you: Have difficulty working out directions or instructions?

Dyslexia

Question 21 of 24
 

When remembering do you: Have difficulty recalling the order of the days or months?

Dyslexia

Question 22 of 24
 

When remembering do you: Have difficulty recalling the order of the alphabet?

Dyslexia

Question 23 of 24
 

When remembering do you: Have difficulty remembering short lists?

Dyslexia

Question 24 of 24
 

When remembering do you: Struggle to remember things like multiplication tables (6x6, 7x7 etc..)?

Dyslexia: Your results

Low
High
You scored %
  • Low Probability

    Your results suggest a low probability of having dyslexia. As dyslexia is most likely to be present from birth and to be life-long in its effects, it is unlikely that you will experience dyslexia in the future. However, sometimes this result can be due to very high levels of intelligence that have enabled you to acquire good coping strategies. If you are still concerned about your result, speak to your GP as occasionally dyslexic symptoms can be shared with other medical conditions that may need addressing.

    Whilst there is no cure for dyslexia, there are numerous methods that can be used to improve the symptoms and strategies for dealing with the challenges. Most of these are more effective in early years (before the age of 8), so early diagnosis is important. Nonetheless, many of the techniques used to help children are also effective for adults. Technology, such as computers for writing and mobile phones for organising/communicating, can be a big help. It is important to note, there is no connection between dyslexia and intelligence.

  • Slight Probability

    Your results suggest a slight probability of having dyslexia. Dyslexia is complex and the severity varies hugely from person to person. If you sense that dyslexia may be affecting your learning or quality of life, then there is help available specifically tailored to adults. If you are concerned about your result, speak to your GP as occasionally dyslexic symptoms can be shared with other medical conditions that may need addressing.

    Whilst there is no cure for dyslexia, there are numerous methods that can be used to improve the symptoms and strategies for dealing with the challenges. Most of these are more effective in early years (before the age of 8), so early diagnosis is important. Nonetheless, many of the techniques used to help children are also effective for adults. Technology, such as computers for writing and mobile phones for organising/communicating, can be a big help. It is important to note, there is no connection between dyslexia and intelligence.

  • Moderate Probability

    Your results suggest a moderate probability of having dyslexia. Dyslexia is complex and the severity varies hugely from person to person. Although there is no cure as such for dyslexia, it need not be a barrier to your future. A range of interventions and educational programmes have proven effective in improving reading and writing skills in many children with the condition. Help specifically tailored to adults is also available. If you are concerned about your result, speak to your GP as occasionally dyslexic symptoms may also indicate other medical conditions which need addressing.

    Whilst there is no cure for dyslexia, there are numerous methods that can be used to improve the symptoms and strategies for dealing with the challenges. Most of these are more effective in early years (before the age of 8), so early diagnosis is important. Nonetheless, many of the techniques used to help children are also effective for adults. Technology, such as computers for writing and mobile phones for organising/communicating, can be a big help. It is important to note, there is no connection between dyslexia and intelligence.

  • High Probability

    Your results suggest a high likelihood of having dyslexia. Dyslexia is complex and the severity of varies hugely from person to person. Although there is no cure as such for dyslexia it need not be a barrier to your future. A range of interventions and educational programmes have proven effective in improving reading and writing skills in many children with the condition. Help specifically tailored to adults is also available. Your result indicates that you would be best to speak to your GP, not least because occasionally dyslexic symptoms may also indicate other medical conditions which need addressing.

    Whilst there is no cure for dyslexia, there are numerous methods that can be used to improve the symptoms and strategies for dealing with the challenges. Most of these are more effective in early years (before the age of 8), so early diagnosis is important. Nonetheless, many of the techniques used to help children are also effective for adults. Technology, such as computers for writing and mobile phones for organising/communicating, can be a big help. It is important to note, there is no connection between dyslexia and intelligence.

Dyslexia

71,072 people have taken the test, and so far...

49% Scored “high”
49% Scored “high”

Highest scoring occupation engineer

Lowest scoring occupation musician

Average regional scores

Light green = low score -> Darkest green = high score
This is a visual representation of scores for this test for several regions of the United Kingdom.

How many of each age group scored “high”?

Age ranges: 18-30, 31-35, 36-40, 41-45, 46-50, 56-60, 61+ 18 to 30 year olds on average scored 40% 31 to 35 year olds on average scored 35% 36 to 40 year olds on average scored 70% 41 to 45 year olds on average scored 30% 46 to 50 year olds on average scored 5% 51 to 55 year olds on average scored 10% 56 to 60 year olds on average scored 20% 61 years and over on average scored 80%
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