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OCD

OCD is a chronic mental health condition associated with obsessive thoughts and compulsive behaviour, where a person feels compelled to carry out a repetitive action or mental act. Often OCD sufferers feel that they need to carry out their compulsion in order to prevent their obsession from becoming true. For example, a person who is obsessed with the fear that they will be burgled may feel compelled to check and re-check the locks on their doors and windows multiple times before being able to leave the house. It is one of the commonest mental health disorders.

This test will ask you how you would react to a given set of circumstances. It was developed by Dr Wayne Goodman of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine (This link opens in a new window/tab). Only a trained medical professional can make a full diagnosis, but this can give a useful indication of your likely risk level.

Time required: 3 minutes

OCD

Before beginning the test, please answer the questions below. These will be used to calculate national totals – they will not be linked to you individually.

Your answers will be remembered as long as your web browser is open. To protect your privacy, close your browser when you have finished your My MindChecker session.

OCD

Question 1 of 25
 

Do you have concerns with contamination (such as dirt, germs, chemicals or radiation) or getting a serious illness?

OCD

Question 2 of 25
 

Are you overconcerned with keeping objects (such as clothing, shopping, tools) in a perfect order, or arranged exactly?

OCD

Question 3 of 25
 

Do you have mental images of death or other horrible events?

OCD

Question 4 of 25
 

Do you have personally unacceptable religious or sexual thoughts?

OCD

Question 5 of 25
 

Do you worry about fire, burglary, or flooding in the house?

OCD

Question 6 of 25
 

Do you worry about accidentally hitting a pedestrian with your car or letting it roll down the hill?

OCD

Question 7 of 25
 

Do you worry about spreading an illness?

OCD

Question 8 of 25
 

Do you worry about losing something valuable?

OCD

Question 9 of 25
 

Do you worry about harm coming to a loved one because you weren't careful enough?

OCD

Question 10 of 25
 

Are you concerned about physically harming a loved one, pushing a stranger in front of a bus, steering your car into oncoming traffic; inappropriate sexual contact; or poisoning dinner guests?

OCD

Question 11 of 25
 

Do you perform excessive or ritualised washing, cleaning, or grooming rituals?

OCD

Question 12 of 25
 

Do you check light switches, taps, the oven, door locks, or your car's handbrake?

OCD

Question 13 of 25
 

Do you perform counting; arranging; 'evening-up' behaviours (such as making sure socks are at same height)?

OCD

Question 14 of 25
 

Do you collect useless objects or inspect the rubbish before it is thrown out?

OCD

Question 15 of 25
 

Do you repeat routine actions (going in/out of a chair, going through a doorway, re-lighting a cigarette) a certain number of times, or until it feels 'just right?'

OCD

Question 16 of 25
 

Do you need to touch objects or people?

OCD

Question 17 of 25
 

Do you unnecessarily re-read or re-write letters or re-open envelopes before you post them?

OCD

Question 18 of 25
 

Do you constantly examine your body for signs of illness?

OCD

Question 19 of 25
 

Do you avoid certain colours ('red' means blood), numbers ('13' is unlucky), or names (those that start with "D" signify death) that are associated with dreaded events or unpleasant thoughts?

OCD

Question 20 of 25
 

Do you feel a need to 'confess' or repeatedly ask for reassurance that you said or did something correctly?

OCD

Question 21 of 25
 

On average, how much time each day is occupied by the thoughts or behaviours you've just answered about?

OCD

Question 22 of 25
 

How much distress do they cause you?

OCD

Question 23 of 25
 

How hard is it for you to control them?

OCD

Question 24 of 25
 

How much do they cause you to avoid doing anything, going anywhere, or being with anyone?

OCD

Question 25 of 25
 

How much do they interfere with your school, work or your social or family life?

OCD: Your results

Low
High
You scored %
  • Low Risk

    Your results suggest that you are at low risk of having OCD. However, only a medical professional can make an accurate diagnosis, so if you are still worried that you may be experiencing compulsive behaviour or anxiety, you should consult your GP for further advice. Remember, most people have some degree of obsessive thoughts/behaviour in their lives. It's only when these begin to have a negative or dominating impact on your day-to-day life that you should have any cause for concern.

    Most OCD sufferers exhibit the following pattern of behaviour:

    • Obsession: Their thoughts become overwhelmed by a constant obsessive fear or concern, such as the possibility they will contract a serious illness through contact with germs.
    • Anxiety: Feelings of anxiety develop, as well as intense stress.
    • Compulsion: They develop a pattern of compulsive behaviour in order to reduce their anxiety, such as repetitive hand washing.
    • Temporary relief: The compulsive behaviour brings temporary relief from anxiety, but the obsession and anxiety return and the cycle begins again.

    A form of psychotherapy, known as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), can be successful in treating OCD. With the right treatment, OCD can be managed very effectively with a likely reduction in the severity of the symptoms, helping achieve a good quality of life. In some cases, treatment can lead to a total cure.

  • Medium Risk

    Your results suggest that you may be at medium risk of having OCD. However, only a medical professional can make an accurate diagnosis, so if you are worried that you may be experiencing compulsive behaviour or anxiety, you should consult your GP for further advice. Remember, most 'normal' people have some degree of obsessive thoughts/behaviour in their lives. It's only when these begin to have a negative or dominating impact on your day-to-day life that you should have any cause for concern.

    Most OCD sufferers exhibit the following pattern of behaviour:

    • Obsession: Their thoughts become overwhelmed by a constant obsessive fear or concern, such as the possibility they will contract a serious illness through contact with germs.
    • Anxiety: Feelings of anxiety develop, as well as intense stress.
    • Compulsion: They develop a pattern of compulsive behaviour in order to reduce their anxiety, such as repetitive hand washing.
    • Temporary relief: The compulsive behaviour brings temporary relief from anxiety, but the obsession and anxiety return and the cycle begins again.

    A form of psychotherapy, known as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), can be successful in treating OCD. With the right treatment, OCD can be managed very effectively with a likely reduction in the severity of the symptoms, helping achieve a good quality of life. In some cases, treatment can lead to a total cure.

  • High Risk

    Your results suggest that you may be at high risk of having OCD. However, only a medical professional can make an accurate diagnosis, so if you are worried that you may be experiencing compulsive behaviour or anxiety, you should consult your GP for further advice. Remember, most 'normal' people have some degree of obsessive thoughts/behaviour in their lives. It's only when these begin to have a negative or dominating impact on your day-to-day life that you should have any cause for concern. There are a number of treatment options available, from psychological and behavioural therapies through to medication, that can reduce the obsessive feelings.

    Most OCD sufferers exhibit the following pattern of behaviour:

    • Obsession: Their thoughts become overwhelmed by a constant obsessive fear or concern, such as the possibility they will contract a serious illness through contact with germs.
    • Anxiety: Feelings of anxiety develop, as well as intense stress.
    • Compulsion: They develop a pattern of compulsive behaviour in order to reduce their anxiety, such as repetitive hand washing.
    • Temporary relief: The compulsive behaviour brings temporary relief from anxiety, but the obsession and anxiety return and the cycle begins again.

    A form of psychotherapy, known as Cognitive Behavioural Therapy (CBT), can be successful in treating OCD. With the right treatment, OCD can be managed very effectively with a likely reduction in the severity of the symptoms, helping achieve a good quality of life. In some cases, treatment can lead to a total cure.

OCD

71,072 people have taken the test, and so far...

49% Scored “high”
49% Scored “high”

Highest scoring occupation engineer

Lowest scoring occupation musician

Average regional scores

Light green = low score -> Darkest green = high score
This is a visual representation of scores for this test for several regions of the United Kingdom.

How many of each age group scored “high”?

Age ranges: 18-30, 31-35, 36-40, 41-45, 46-50, 56-60, 61+ 18 to 30 year olds on average scored 40% 31 to 35 year olds on average scored 35% 36 to 40 year olds on average scored 70% 41 to 45 year olds on average scored 30% 46 to 50 year olds on average scored 5% 51 to 55 year olds on average scored 10% 56 to 60 year olds on average scored 20% 61 years and over on average scored 80%
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